Information for the parents of college students

Random header image... Refresh for more!

Book Review: It’s the Student Not the College

There is a wealth of literature available to help parents cope with the transition to college and the changes that occur throughout the college years and beyond.  We’ve offered some lists of recommended reading, and there is something for everyone. Check out our Recommended Reading Lists at the end of this post.

From time to time, we like to review some of the books available for parents of college students.

In this review, we’ll take a look at It’s the Student, Not the College: The Secrets of Succeeding at Any School Without Going Broke or Crazy
by Kristin M. White.

It’s the Student Not the College should be on every parent’s reading list – and probably on their student’s list as well.  It is important reading for college parents, but even more important reading for high school parents whose students are still in the midst of the admission process.  We agree wholeheartedly with the premise of the book.  According to the author, “the message at the heart of this book (is) that success is within a person’s own power and will not be determined by the college (a student) attends.”

[Read more →]

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

July 27, 2015   No Comments

Parenting College Students: Reading List #5

This post includes a list of ten books of interest to parents of college students.  We’ve previously published a list of twelve books, a list of fourteen titles, another list of twelve additional titles, and still another list of fourteen titles which you might want to check out. There are certainly even more resources available, but these lists should give parents a good start on more than enough material to support them through the college years.  All of the books have different styles and approaches, so it is important to find the books which resonate for you.

We are not necessarily endorsing these books, but we’d like to help you find material available.  You won’t want to read them all, but you might look for some titles and approaches that intrigue you.

Over the next few months, we will continue to review some of these books to provide a bit more guidance about their content and perspective.  Check our “Reviews” category to see what we’ve reviewed so far.  Happy reading!

[Read more →]

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

July 20, 2015   No Comments

Is College Transfer the “New Normal?”

Gone are the days when most college students begin and end their college career in four years at a single institution.  Many parents, and their students, still imagine that scenario as students engage in the admissions process and agonize over finding just the right college or university for them.  They see themselves graduating from there at the end of four years.

We now know that fewer and fewer students are completing their college degree in four years.  Five years is now closer to the national average, with many students taking longer than that.  Now a new report has been released indicating that nearly 38% of students who entered college in 2008 moved to a new institution at least once within a six year period.

The National Student Clearinghouse Research Center, a non-profit organization based in Virginia tracked 3.6 million students who enrolled in college in the fall of 2008. They looked at the number of students who moved to a new institution prior to completing their bachelor’s degree.  Their findings are certainly important for institutions and policymakers, but may also be important in helping parents be prepared for that moment when their student may come home and say, “Mom and Dad, I want to transfer.”

[Read more →]

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

July 14, 2015   No Comments

The Race to Place: A College Parent’s Guide to Advanced Placement

As July approaches each year, many high school students eagerly await the release of Advanced Placement scores.  These scores may determine whether students will receive college credit or have the option of being placed in advanced, upper level college courses.  If you have a high school student, you may be wondering whether your student should be taking Advanced Placement, or AP courses.  If you have a student about to enter college, you may even wonder whether your student missed an important opportunity.  The short answer is, it depends . . .

Advanced Placement, or AP, courses allow students to participate in college level classes as part of their high school curriculum.  Most students who take an AP course then take the national exam for that course at the end of the year.  Students who receive a score that is high enough may receive college credit and may be exempted from taking certain introductory level classes. More than 2600 colleges in 100 countries grant credit for AP work.  31% of schools consider AP scores as they award scholarships.  AP courses and exams are offered in over 30 subjects.

What are the advantages of taking on the harder work of an AP class?

There are several advantages to taking AP classes:

[Read more →]

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

July 10, 2015   No Comments

College Parent News and Views

The more that college parents know and understand about the college experience, the less we worry and the better we will be able to help our students to succeed and thrive throughout their college career.  However, there is an overwhelming amount of information out there on the web.   We’d like to help you find some of the information that might be most interesting and useful to you as a college parent.

In News and Views we share recent college related news and sources we’ve found as we do our research.  We hope that this feature will help to introduce you to new ideas and to help you keep up with some of the current issues that may affect your college student – and you.

We invite you to read some of the articles suggested below – and to let us know what you think of some of the ideas included here.

[Read more →]

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

July 1, 2015   No Comments

Your College Freshman: The Summer Flood of Information

When your student was in high school, she probably received what may have felt like an overwhelming amount of recruiting material from colleges.  Some may have come in the physical mail, and much of it may have come electronically.  Whatever its form, it just kept coming.

Now that your student has been accepted to college, has paid the deposit at her chosen school, and is about to head to college in a few short weeks, there is a new flood of information arriving – and this flood may make the earlier information seem like a mere trickle.  And there is an important difference this time: this information is crucial and should be carefully read and considered.

Lots of summer information

Although some of the summer information arriving from your student’s new college may come in hard copy through the mail, much of it will come electronically.  And the information that arrives electronically will be sent to your student, not to you.  It will most likely arrive at your student’s new college e-mail address, so it is important that she make sure that she sets that up as soon as the college gives her the log-in information.  Be sure to ask her whether she’s done that.

[Read more →]

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

June 29, 2015   No Comments

Whose Responsibility Is It to Find Your College Graduate a Job?

You send your child to college.  He chooses a major.  He takes the appropriate classes.  He graduates.  And then . . . ?

Many students, and their parents, may assume that after college, after all of that tuition, after preparing the resume and sending the cover letters, the perfect job will materialize.  Sometimes it does.  But more often, there’s a lot of work that goes into finding – and landing – that job.

The question of how much responsibility the college or university has for helping your student secure a job is currently a controversial topic.  Should the college focus on academically educating the student and leave it up to the student to find a job, or should the college be preparing the student for and helping the student secure a job?

[Read more →]

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

June 22, 2015   No Comments

Who’s Minding Your College Student’s Health?

We all want our children to be as healthy as possible.  When they were young, we took them for their regular check-ups, and we often continue to monitor and care for them when they are sick.  When our child becomes a college student, one of the many things that she will need to learn is to manage is her own healthcare

Fortunately, we do not send our college students off to a healthcare vacuum. Virtually every college or university offers some form of healthcare for its students.

College healthcare services have expanded from the earlier days of basic care for sick or injured students to a broader definition of health and wellness.  Most current college health services cover the treatment, management and prevention of health conditions and emergencies by providing onsite medical and counseling services and general wellness programming. The college healthcare field has shown significant growth in mission, services and facilities, with the greatest growth in recent years being in the area of mental health services.

[Read more →]

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

June 15, 2015   2 Comments

What Is Enrollment Management?

If you are about to send your child off to college, you wonder a lot about how your student will succeed, and you may also wonder what the college will do to help your student succeed.  There are a lot of individual offices, departments, programs and personnel who will intersect with and support your student.  Sometimes, it may seem impossible to keep it all straight.

The college’s Strategic Enrollment Management process will help the college ensure that there is a comprehensive plan in place to help shape the school’s enrollment and support its students.  Colleges want to build the best entering class, but also help those students succeed and graduate.

Enrollment Management, often referred to as Strategic Enrollment Management (SEM) is comprehensive process which institutions use to help them shape their enrollment and meet their goals.  Essentially, rather than many different areas of the institution work independently, Strategic Enrollment Management allows the institution to look at the entire process of how they recruit, admit, enroll, retain and graduate students.  It often also includes how the institution intersects with its alumni as well.

[Read more →]

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

June 8, 2015   2 Comments

College Is a Next Step – That’s All

Heading off to college is a big step. Your student has anticipated this step for a long time and probably worked hard throughout high school to get ready, apply, and make that final decision.  As parents, you’ve been involved – sometimes in the thick of it all and sometimes on the sideline – and you are also anticipating a big change.

But as big as that step to college seems, it is just that – one more step.  And the step is that much easier for your student when he is prepared.  Perhaps one of the reasons we all have so much anxiety about the college admissions process and the college transition process is that we see it as a giant leap rather than a step.

Your student has taken steps throughout his life – some bigger than others.  There were those literal first steps, then daycare or preschool, kindergarten, middle school and high school.  Remember how scary each of those steps felt at the time?  Your student may have learned to ride a bike, have a first sleepover, play in a first athletic game, give a first music or dance recital, talk to a girl (!), go on a date, and learn to drive a car.  Scary, right?

[Read more →]

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

June 1, 2015   1 Comment