College Experiences That Lead to Well-Being After Graduation (Part 4): Working on a Longer Project

This is the fourth in a series of articles about experiences in college that can affect graduates’ engagement and well-being after college. Read the first three in the series here, here, and here.

A recent poll of nearly 30,000 college graduates conducted jointly by Purdue University and Gallup, Inc. looked at the relationship between college experiences and college graduates’ lives post-graduation. The study examined workplace engagement and graduates’ sense of well-being as well as factors influencing students’ life while in college.

According to the results of this study, six factors emerged as important influences on graduates’ engagement and well-being. Over a six week period, our series, College Experiences That Lead to Well-Being After Graduation will examine each of these factors and how students can take control of their college experiences to make sure that they participate in the activities in college which will help them in the future. We hope parents will share these ideas with their college students to help them work to pursue these important experiences.

I worked on a project that took a semester or more to complete.

Thirty-two percent of graduates responding to this question strongly agreed. That means that nearly one third of college students worked on a long-term project – but nearly two-thirds did not. That means that a large majority of students have not had the experience of seeing through a longer project before they enter their career. Since many projects in the workplace are longer term projects, these students may be missing a key piece of preparation for workplace demands. And more importantly for this study, the majority of graduates have not engaged in one of the activities which will help them thrive beyond college.

Read moreCollege Experiences That Lead to Well-Being After Graduation (Part 4): Working on a Longer Project


College Experiences That Lead to Well-Being After Graduation (Part 3): Making the Most of a Mentor

This is the third in a series of articles about experiences in college that can affect graduates’ engagement and well-being after college. Read the first in the series here, and the second here.

A recent poll of nearly 30,000 college graduates conducted jointly by Purdue University and Gallup, Inc. looked at the relationship between college experiences and college graduates’ lives post-graduation. The study examined workplace engagement and graduates’ sense of well-being as well as factors influencing students’ life while in college.

According to the results of this study, six factors emerged as important influences on graduates’ engagement and well-being. Over the next six weeks, our series, College Experiences That Lead to Well-Being After Graduation will examine each of these factors and how students can take control of their college experiences to make sure that they participate in the activities in college which will help them in the future. We hope parents will share these ideas with their college students to help them work to pursue these important experiences.

Read moreCollege Experiences That Lead to Well-Being After Graduation (Part 3): Making the Most of a Mentor


College Experiences That Lead to Well-Being After Graduation (Part 2): Having Someone Care

This is the second in a series of articles about experiences in college that can affect graduates’ engagement and well-being after college. Read the first in the series here.

A recent poll of nearly 30,000 college graduates conducted jointly by Purdue University and Gallup, Inc. looked at the relationship between college experiences and college graduates’ lives post-graduation. The study examined workplace engagement and graduates’ sense of well-being as well as factors influencing students’ life while in college.

According to the results of this study, six factors emerged as important influences on graduates’ engagement and well-being. Over the next six weeks, our series, College Experiences That Lead to Well-Being After Graduation will examine each of these factors and how students can take control of their college experiences to make sure that they participate in the activities in college which will help them in the future. We hope parents will share these ideas with their college students to help them work to pursue these important experiences.

My professors at college cared about me as a person.

Less than a third of graduates in this study, 27%, strongly agreed with the above statement. Obviously, this means that the large majority of students who attend college do not feel that they make a strong enough connection with their faculty members for the professor to care about them as a person.

Read moreCollege Experiences That Lead to Well-Being After Graduation (Part 2): Having Someone Care


College Experiences That Lead to Well-Being After Graduation (Part 1): Getting Excited About Learning

A recent poll of nearly 30,000 college graduates conducted jointly by Purdue University and Gallup, Inc. looked at the relationship between college experiences and college graduates’ lives post-graduation. The study examined workplace engagement and graduates’ sense of well-being as well as factors influencing students’ life while in college.

According to the results of this study, six factors emerged as important influences on graduates’ engagement and well-being. Over the next six weeks, our series, College Experiences That Lead to Well-Being After Graduation will examine each of these factors and how students can take control of their college experiences to make sure that they participate in the activities in college which will help them in the future. We hope parents will share these ideas with their college students to help them work to pursue these important experiences.

Read moreCollege Experiences That Lead to Well-Being After Graduation (Part 1): Getting Excited About Learning


Taking Control of Your College Experiences Now Can Increase Your Well-Being After College

Did you know that there are some things that college students can do while in college that can help them enjoy workplace engagement and a meaningful life after college? We’d like to talk about that over the next six weeks.

A recent poll of nearly 30,000 college graduates conducted jointly by Purdue University and Gallup, Inc. looked at the relationship between college experiences and college graduates’ lives post-graduation. The study examined workplace engagement and graduates’ sense of well-being as well as factors influencing students’ life while in college.

According to the results of this study, six factors emerged as important influences on graduates’ engagement and well-being. Graduates who responded positively to the following six statements had a greater chance of experiencing strong workplace engagement and well-being after college.

Read moreTaking Control of Your College Experiences Now Can Increase Your Well-Being After College


Is Your College Student Preparing Now for a Meaningful Life After College?

College is really just a stop along the path to the rest of your life. With all of the anxiety about college admission, getting into the “right” college, and succeeding in school, we sometimes forget that these four years simply lead students to the next phase of their lives. But what happens in college certainly affects that next phase. Surprising new information indicates that it is the experiences that the student has – many of which are in his control – that may matter more than where the student attends school

A new research study, conducted jointly by Purdue University and Gallup, Inc. attempted to look at the relationship between college experiences and college graduates’ lives post-graduation. The study was conducted early in 2014 and surveyed nearly 30,000 U.S. adults who had completed at least a bachelor’s degree.

The Gallup-Purdue study attempted to examine workplace engagement and current well-being of college graduates. Workplace engagement was defined as being” deeply involved in, enthusiastic about, and committed to their work” and well-being/thriving was defined as “strong, consistent, and progressing in all areas of their well-being.” Isn’t this what we want for our children as they become adults?

Read moreIs Your College Student Preparing Now for a Meaningful Life After College?


Why Your Student Should Consider An On-Campus Internship

Employers are increasingly looking for internships on applicants’ resumes. Internships indicate some real-world experience. Some students complete multiple internships – as material for their resumes, but also to gain experience or to explore different careers.  Internships also allow students to learn and practice professionalism so they’ll be ready for that first job.

But what if your student isn’t quite ready yet for an off-campus internship placement?  Or what if your student can’t travel off-campus, or has multiple time constraints?  Or, what if your student’s interests lie in higher education rather than in the commercial world?  An on-campus internship might be just the answer for your student.

Read moreWhy Your Student Should Consider An On-Campus Internship


What Your College Student May Be Looking for in a Job

We’ve written an earlier post about a 2010 study conducted by NACE (National Association of Colleges and Employers) which investigated college graduates’ attitudes and approaches toward their first post-college jobs.  We suggested that some of the information in that study might help parents understand what their recent graduates faced as well as some interesting topics for conversation with students about their hopes and dreams for jobs.

A new 2012 study, this time conducted by Net Impact, adds additional food for thought and topics for understanding and conversation about what current college students, as well as graduates want from employers.  Net Impact, a national organization which hopes to drive positive change in the workplace and the world, helps employees use their careers to tackle social and environmental problems.  This study surveyed 1,726 currently enrolled university students and currently employed college graduates.  The study explored respondents’ life goals, job satisfaction and prioritization for making an impact at work.

Once again, we think some of the information gathered should provide parents of graduates and soon-to-be graduates some important topics to discuss with their students.  We hope that some of the following information from this study will give you some topics for conversation as you discuss your student’s employment choices and satisfaction.

Read moreWhat Your College Student May Be Looking for in a Job


Ten (More) Gifts for College Graduates

We’ve written an earlier post with twenty-five suggestions for gifts for your college grad.  We think that list is quite comprehensive and even a bit creative.  If you’re looking for ideas for graduation, don’t miss looking at that list.  However, there are always more ideas that float to the surface.  Here are a few more ideas to get you started.

As with our previous list of gift suggestions, as well as our annual holiday suggestions, we know how personal gifts should be.  These gift suggestions are intended to be starting points for your own thinking.  Some will be out of range for you financially and some will seem silly to you.  Take them for what they are and add the spin of how well you know the personality, needs, and interests of your graduate.

Have fun imagining and growing your own ideas.

Read moreTen (More) Gifts for College Graduates


Is Your College Senior Suffering from Senioritis? 13 Reasons Why It May Not Be What You Think

This is the first of two posts about the senioritis sometimes experienced by college seniors.  In this post we look at some of the roots or causes of your student’s feelings.  In our next post, we’ll consider what this senioritis may look like and how you, as a parent, might help your student cope.

We hear a lot about senioritis and high school seniors.  It’s that apathy and lack of motivation that hits in the latter part of their senior year when they’ve been accepted to college and they let their guard down and struggle to keep their grades up and stay focused on school.  Severe senioritis in that last year of high school could even result in having a college rescind a student’s admission, so it can be a serious ailment.

We hear less about senioritis during the last year of college, but it exists.  Often, it looks much like high school senioritis.  Your student has been in school now for sixteen or more years, and he is tired of being a student, loses focus and motivation, skips classes, does poorly on assignments, and generally appears unengaged.

Read moreIs Your College Senior Suffering from Senioritis? 13 Reasons Why It May Not Be What You Think


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